Car stuff.. what else did you expect??

Case Studies : Changing an 92 Honda Accord Axle with HERI Axles

While I am still recovering from my crash, that doesn’t stop people from asking for help on their cars! A friend of mine had her axle go out on her 1992 Honda Accord, her CV boot had been torn for quite some time, where else would you buy parts other than Pro Street Online?

I love helping my friends… but MY BACK HURTS!! lol

After a quick call to the guys at Pro Street, they hooked it up with a set of their new HERI Axle lineup. At first I couldn’t believe how great of a deal this axle was! At just 45.99, it was significantly cheaper than remanufactured axles and definitely a high quality axle.

Pics below:

After removing the axle nut on the Accord, we undo the 3 lower bolts to the lower control arm, shown here :

Now, undo the sway bar links and swing the front lower control arm downward and towards the rear of the car.

With this completed, you can now pull the entire axle out, and slide your new HERI axle in!

The HERI axle fit great, and after talking to the guys at Pro Street, we may just try a set of HERI axles on one of our Project cars!

More results to come! Happy boosting!

Project 240SX : Fortune favors the bold.

Well, it’s been a while since I’ve updated my blog here due to this unfortunate accident.

oops…

I crashed, I’ve gotten over it but my back hasn’t.

It was only a matter of time I suppose, given the abuse the S14 had been taking at the track. Fortunately, I’m relatively okay and I’m pretty fortunate to have escaped the entire episode without incident.

Moving forward, the car will be rebuilt, better, faster and lighter hopefully in time for next year.

Meanwhile, my focus for the 2JZGTE swap has taken an abrupt turn when I picked up Project SC a week ago. It took me some time to find a 5 speed manual, but I just didn’t want to deal with converting the auto to stick before my 2JZ swap.

Luck would have it, I found a cheap deal on a green 92 in SF. It didn’t take me long to swap over my wheels and rims, after a trip to Treds and some Butchie love.

Up next, the return of the 240SX, but not before some SC300 modding.

Note : The title is borrowed from jsworks, a fellow gearhead, enthusiast, inspiration and overall cool guy.

Check out his work after the jump!

JS Works Fortune Favors the Bold

Case Studies : How to fix the P0345 OBDII error in a 2006 Infiniti G35

My 2006 Infiniti G35 Sedan has served me quite well for a number of years, and despite it’s high mileage, been an excellent car for most of it’s life.

With over 200k on the odometer, I guess I cannot fault the Infiniti for acting up recently but I’ve had a difficult time diagnosing it’s current issue. It doesn’t happen all the time, but when warm, the car begins to sputter and misfire and occasionally lurches off idle or with  slight acceleration.

After which time, the check engine light never seemed to light off, but the VCD and ABS lights would stay lit after the car would sputter. After wrongly assuming it was coil related I started testing them, until the car finally threw a code so that I could diagnose it.

And lo and behold, it’s the good ol P0345 OBDII error – P0345 Camshaft Position Sensor Failure A Circuit Bank 2 ; this code indicates that a problem was detected in the camshaft position sensor circuit of bank 2 ( which is the driver side of your VQ35DE).

The steps to diagnose your P0345 code in your G35 ( or any car for that matter )

Read the rest of the article by clicking here.

Case Studies : Prepping Big Red for 5-9 Madness Part II – 6/21/2012

We’ve given Big Red a proper cleaning and in preparation of the next 5-9 Madness at Vic Hubbard, after upgrading the spark plug guides and wires / plugs / gaskets, we’ll be taking the next step today the day of the show.

Installing a new Edelbrock water neck, 160 thermostat and Edelbrock gaskets will help freshen things up for the show!

A shot of the old intake manifold, thermostat and thermostat housing.

Edelbrock part number 7201 will get our intake leaks taken care of and give us a chance to service the carburetor and intake plenum.

A shot with the carburetor off, as we replace all gaskets and service the carb.

Here’s a shot of the SBC all finished up and ready for the 5-9 Madness Show at Vic Hubbard / Pro Street Online.

Want to see more of the classic? Come on out to the 5-9 Madness Car Show!

Happy Cruising!

Case Studies : Prepping Big Red for 9-5 Madness

We’ve given Big Red a proper cleaning and in preparation of the next 9-5 Madness at Vic Hubbard, we’ve decided to finally get off our behinds and get some work done.

We’ll be adding a RPC valve cover kit and repair the current spark plug wire issues on the SBC.

Damage from headers and broken plastic guides

We’ll be using Taylor 98069 Spark plug wires to replace the spark plug wires on Big   Red.

Next we use RPC R6039 to help add a nice polished look to our engine bay as well as arrange the new spark plug wires in a manner that will help protect the wires from heat damage.

This accent piece works great for any SBC especially with the front 2 wires, as it gives just enough curve and cushion to push it ahead of the header. Heat and stress cracking can cause problems as shown below :

After a few minutes, we have the guides on and wires crimped down and run.

These things are off the chain!

Next up, we install an Edelbrock Endurashine intake manifold plenum, a new Holley Double Pumper carb – part number HLY-0-4778S and dressing up the engine bay further in preparation of Vic Hubbard’s next 9-5 Madness Car Show.

Happy Cruising!

Project 240SX : And the hits just keep on coming…… CT26 turbo failure

I’ve begun to tear into the 2jz and start cleaning, prepping and stripping for the swap into my s14. It’s been slow going for Project 240SX, but I’ve had more than enough on my plate lately.

The saga of the 2JZ just refuses to die down, because after inspecting the CT26 turbos, I’ve been setback yet again.

Using a turbo bench, it appears as though the CT26 will not build more boost than 4 psi.

This CT26 from a 7MGTE was a cheap starter turbo to get my swap in and running before cams and headswap and a bigger single.

At a the cheap price I had found it at ( thanks to Frank @ TTA ) it was a no brainer but now it won’t build any boost which makes it about as useful as a doorjam.

Troubleshooting a CT26 Turbo

Recommended tools : Air compressor, 14mm open wrench, 8mm socket

First we check the shaft play of the turbo, which seems to be fine. There are no excessive oil leaks or signs of blown seals on our CT26, and the CHRA seems to be in decent shape all things considered.

The turbo spins freely and nothing looks like it’s hitting one another, so we turn to the wastegate.

Using a air hose nozzle to gently blow into the internal wastegate inlet, the arm of the internal wastegate appears to be moving.

That means either the flapper is done or the arm may be bent out of shape, holding the flapper open.

Removing the 4 14mm nuts that hold the 02 housing to the exhaust housing. This will allow access to the internal wastegate flapper and troubleshooting the lack of turbo pressure.

Upon opening the unit back up we find that the internal passage that leads to the flapper have completely cracked open. Since the flapper can no longer close the opening sufficiently to build boost due to the stress and cracking, it means that I’ll need a new housing.

This brings me to a crossroads because if this turbo cost anymore than it already did ( nothing ) I had to decide whether or not the investment would be worth it in the CT26.

Next up : Looking at possible turbo replacements

Case Studies : Following the progress of Tomei’s Hyundai Genesis Turbo

My first experience with a Hyundai was when I was a teenager, and my father owned a 1984 white 4door Hyundai Excel. This thing was the epitome of the 80’s econo-crapbox, constructed with cheap plastics and budget minded parts that  translated into a reputation of being notoriously unreliable.

I can remember a time when the word Hyundai would make car enthusiasts turn up their noses and spit in disgust at the Korean Automaker that struggled to make a name for themselves in the US.

While my fathers Hyundai Excel ran for over 400,000 miles on the original motor, for the most part this reputation was well deserved.

Fast forward 30 years, and Hyundai has done a marvelous job reinventing themselves, and while the foray into the sport compact market has netted the Korean automaker less than desirable results in previous years, they seem to have hit a homer with the Hyundai Genesis.

While the luxury sedan has been well received by the automotive press, the coupe (shown here) is powered by the G4KC, a 4 cylinder turbocharged aluminum motor named the Theta.

What can I say? I’m a sucker for 4 cylinder turbocharged goodness!

With the revolution in rwd sport compacts such as the Genesis and the FR-S, RWD sport compact enthusiasts have never had it better!

I will be following the progress of one of my favorite tuners, Tomei and their Genesis Coupe Turbo to see just how it stacks up against some of the classic 4 cylinder turbocharged titans that have graced the US shores such as the SR20DET, EJ25, and my all time favorite the 4G63.

Stay tuned and happy boosting!

Case Studies : The Big Red Machine – Jesse’s 1948 Ford Custom

Having worked in the aftermarket industry for 15 years, seeing countless cars, building countless motors and attending countless shows, it’s not often a car makes me break out the nicknames.

But in the case of this hot red 1948 Ford Custom, even the jaded automotive enthusiast like myself has to smile like a kid in a candy store.

It’s not often I stumble across something so cool that it inspires me to give it a nickname like “The Big Red Machine”. Originally a nickname given to the powerhouse Russian National Men’s Ice Hockey Team, Jesse’s 1949 Ford Custom is every bit as badass and dominant as those teams once were.

This vehicle was a full ground up restore, and built with love and care that is hard to find in today’s automotive enthusiast.

The dash is a blend of classic looks, hot rod style and speaks of a much simpler time and age in American history.

At the heart of this Ford Custom is a 350 SBC, mated to a 4 speed automatic and stall. Utilizing a Holley Diachromate carburetor, we have a set of AFR heads on the way to help squeeze some extra ponies out of the 350.

Our plans include a fabricating a turbo kit for this 350 to help get it some extra “oomph”

My favorite feature of this timeless classic? The in hood scoop that allows for fresh vented air to flow into the cabin! Subaru eat your heart out!

Up next for the Big Red Machine, we clean up some issues with the steering column, repair the power steering and start to mock up turbo manifolds.

Happy Boosting!

Project 240SX – Oh… the Irony….

Well as some of you know, our flush mount hood pin install on a S13 writeup caused some legal issues to come to the forefront. As those issues do not pertain to me individually, I would encourage those shopping for a flush mount hood pin kit ( or ANY performance part ) to do their due diligence before plopping your hard earned cash down on anything.

So imagine the irony when my JDM hood flipped up and smashed my windshield and roof in the middle of a Patterson Pass run.

At around 45 mph, entering a hairpin turn on the south end of the canyon road, my hood suddenly flipped up. With less than 30 feet between me and a large drop off into a canyon, I was reminded why I installed a set of Evolution X calipers on my 240SX.

The car came to a stop just as the front passenger side tire had rolled off the cliff, largely unharmed but not without damage.

What my roof looks like now…..

What my kouki hood looks like now…

Where the stock hood latch decided to shear off it’s mounting points. I am unclear as to how exactly this happened, but I have a feeling the previous owner had performed some “modifications”

I am just happy that I got to walk away from the accident, and that no further damage was done.

Unfortunately, kouki hoods are hard to find nowadays and I am having a hard time justifying a carbon fiber hood since I’ll most likely have to cut holes for ventilation once the 2jz goes in.

The accident has also sped up my timetable as far as getting work done on the car. It’s just too easy for me to get into a groove and be lazy, and perhaps the hood incident will get me to get off my ass and actually complete this project.

Time will tell..