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How To Insert WordPress Media

When you want to create an interactive and fun blog or WordPress website, you’ve got to know hot to insert WordPress media. One of the most powerful content management systems available today, WordPress accepts many forms of rich media. Images, videos and specialized media like podcasts or audio files integrates seamlessly.

WordPress features an uploader that allows you to upload from your computer, or from a remote URL. To begin learning how to insert WordPress media, simply click on the button that is labeled Add Media. When you click on this upload button, you’ll be able to insert any form of media you can imagine.

Insert WordPress Media 1

Videos, audio files and images can be uploaded to your server and inserted into your posts or pages. This can also be done by dragging files or content from your computer into your WordPress media upload window. Once you have uploaded the image or media you want in your blog post or WordPress page, you can change a variety of details about the file.

Insert WordPress Media

Here are just some of the details and information you can alter about the media you are inserting into WordPress.

  • Title – This is the title of the image or media, and you can change or rename. This is meant to help people identify your media, and search engines can also pick up on the media for identification.
  • Alt – This adds an “alt” description to your file in the event that your website browser cannot display the media. If the browser has an issue, it will display this alt title instead.
  • Caption – Here you can add content or a caption under the image or media file. This option varies for most themes.
  • Alignment – Change the alignment of your media to left, right or centered in your post or page.
  • Size – You can adjust or change the sizing of your media in this field. Some themes will have predetermined sizing set, but your image will always try to retain the proper aspect ratio in most cases.

 

Once you have set these details, you can click on the button labeled “Insert into Post” to put it into your post or page. Once you’ve uploaded your image or media, you are done! You now know how to insert WordPress media into your post or page!

Happy Blogging!

What is WordPress Hosting?

WordPress hosting is a service where a company provides you with a hosted server solution. This basically means you pay for a service and a server that will hold your WordPress files. In essence it’s where your WordPress website will live. There are many different kinds of hosts out there, including the services from WordPress directly.

As you can imagine these hosting companies all vary in speed, service and the features they can provide for you. They also all will provide you with their own pricing structure, and some of them are even as cheap as a dollar a month. As cheap as some of these WordPress hosting companies may be, it’s a good idea to remember that you always get what you pay for.

Wordpress Hosting

Most people starting out with WordPress can get confused with the term of WordPress hosting. If you are confused there’s an easy way to think about WordPress hosting. When you are working on any document on your computer and writing / creating a file, eventually you’ll need to save it. This is the same theme or idea behind WordPress hosting.

When you build a WordPress website and begin creating it, you’ll need a place to save it or host it. Your WordPress hosting company will be the place where your website files will stay, so that anyone on the Internet can come and see your installation.

Some people get into trouble especially when they decide to save a few pennies on their WordPress hosting. This can cause problems later on down the road, especially if you are working on a shared platform and need a dedicated one.

What is shared WordPress hosting?

Otherwise known as cloud computing, shared hosting means that you are sharing resources and hardware with possibly hundreds of over subscribers. This means that you’ve got a limit on bandwidth, memory and computing power. While shared hosting is cheap and affordable, it can be extremely slow when your website gets enough traffic and attention. If your website is slow, search engines will penalize you which is not what you want.

If you plan on your website getting enough traffic and having hundreds if not thousands of visitors a day, think about a dedicated host. This is a machine that’s dedicated to your website, where you won’t have to fight for resources and bandwidth.

Thinking about starting a website and not sure if WordPress is for you? Check out my services page if you are in need of a dedicated WordPress installation service.

 

Project SC : A New Beginning… Or is it?

I have to admit that moving from the nimble and athletic S14 chassis to a heavy pig like the  Z30 ( or Soarer if you are in Japan ), hasn’t been an easy transition for me.

It’s taken some time, but the comfort of the SC300 and overall finish make for an excellent street car and comfortable cruiser. However the issue of curb weight / power to the wheels is still undeniably present, but nothing a 2JZGTE swap won’t fix.

First however, I’ve got to ditch the belt driven fan assembly, because…. well…. it’s stupid. Not only does it constantly spin and create a drag on the rotating assembly, but its freakishly huge and bulky, taking away precious engine compartment space.

Upgrading to a slimline fan assembly

We’ll be using a Mishimoto fan shroud, and 2 12 inch dual speed fans for A/C connectivity ( California is hot! ) as well as a fan controller for maximum reliability.

This will be replacing this honking huge piece of crap.

For a fan controller, I personally love the Derale lineup of controllers which feature a safety bypass, dual speed control as well as your choice of probes and temp senders.

For this install, I have opted for the push in style of connector for ease of install. Why? well the 2JZGTE is a very high temp motor, and given the turbocharged nature of this motor cooling is of the utmost importance, especially on a daily driver.

However a true 3 core radiator is not in stock currently from Mishimoto or Fluidyne, two of my favorite radiator companies. So for the meantime, we’ll be rocking this push in style sender until our permanent radiator arrives.

This install is berry berry easy sir.

First we crack the 12mm nuts on the fan assembly, while keeping the tensioner tight on the belt itself. There are 4 10 mm bolts that hold the shroud in place, you may or may not need to remove your factory battery to remove the shroud.

Once these have been loosened, then undo the tension by turning the belt tensioner clockwise. Slip the accessory belt over the pulley and then proceed to carefully remove your factory fan and shroud.

Install of the new assembly is very straightforward, outside of a fabricated driver side mount.

After wiring in the ground to the Derale relay, we start up the SC and get it to operating temps very quickly. The slimline fan not only makes the engine bay look more clean and organized, but gives me at least 5 more inches to move and wiggle when the GTE motor is ready to go in.

I also ditched my Stern ST7’s for another set of Stern wheels, this time in 19 inch and ST11. With 19×8.5 in front and a 25 offset with 19×9.5 in rear with a 30 offset gives me a good stance and is cheap enough so that I won’t cry when a rim bends due to California highways.

Not really looking to change much more of the looks about the car until after my motor swap is completed. Lots of work on that front so I’ll be busy no doubt there.

First however, I’ve got to prep the wiring for the GTE swap, which means lots of wires and a lot of cursing. Fun.

Next up : Wiring up the 2JZ engine harness and combining with the SC300 body plug for a true plug and play installation.

Happy boosting!

Piggyback Heaven – Installing a Greddy Emanage in a DC2

Another piggyback, another writeup on how to install a Greddy Emanage into any 97+ OBDII Integra running a P72 ecu.

When we last visited our Project DC2, we had encountered some timing issues under load and more specifically anything over 15 psi of boost as our FPR wasn’t getting the job done.

This article on how to install a Greddy emanage has been moved permanently. Please check it out by clicking here.

RB25 Power

Click here for the rest of the How To Install a Greddy Emanage

Piggyback Heaven – Installing a SAFC NEO in a SRT-4

Today we are installing the ever popular SAFC NEO into our Project SRT-4. While piggyback computers aren’t as commonplace today as they were 10 years ago, they are still quite useful for the tuner on a budget.

While I install quite a few AFC NEO’s, I don’t recommend this install for the SRT-4 due to the difference in TPS and MAP sensor voltage. The AFC NEO operates in a range from 0-5 volts, where as the SRT-4 does not.

When you add aftermarket injectors such as the 760cc ( or 76# for those domestic fellows ), you can cause all kinds of problems without a device to lean out the mixture. Using a SAFC, we aren’t truly “leaning out” or “turning down” the fuel, but rather fooling the ECU into seeing less air, thus accomplishing the same result.

OBDII vehicles such as our SRT-4 have 2 values you should keep your eyes on, the STFT ( short term fuel trim ) and LTFT ( long term fuel trim ). When the SRT-4’s ecu sees the overly rich condition created by the larger injectors and upgraded fuel system, it will decrease these values in a vain attempt to restore “normalcy”

The problem is, when the SRT-4’s STFT and LTFT reach a value of -14, the ECU throws the ever popular P0170 Check Engine Light, Fuel Trim Malfunction (Bank 1).

By installing our SAFC NEO, we can lower the airflow value before it reaches the ECU allowing us to adjust the injector pulse width and therefore leaning the vehicle out.

Tools you will need for this install :

  • Soldering iron
  • Solder
  • SAFC NEO
  • 10mm wrench
  • wire cutters

First you must undo the ECM, held to the chassis by 10mm bolts, then unplug the ECM terminals.

FIrst, locate your C1 connector, the fourth plug down on your ECM, it will have an BLACK housing.

Here is a look at front face of a ECM connector, the back of this connector is what you will need to pull off.

You will have to pull back on the mounting tabs ( all four ) and pull the back half of the housing off to expose the wires.

I really really really hate these connectors......

With the back half removed, we’ll start the wiring fun by starting with our ground wires. The two wires in question are brown and black, locate those on your AFC harness and find pin 18 on your C1 module.

Using your wire strippers, expose 2 spots of the wire approximately 2 inches apart. The brown wire needs to be soldered in before the black wire, and closer to the ECM.

With your grounds properly wired in and installed, we now move to the 2 power wires on the SAFC NEO. Locate pin 11 on ECM Connector C1, this pin is a blue wire with a red stripe.

Wire in your red wire and red with white stripe on the NEO harness to pin 11, in the same method as you did the ground wire. Make sure the red wire with white stripe is closest to the ECM.

Now with the power and ground sorted out, move onto the MAP signal wires on the NEO harness. These wires are white and yellow on the NEO harness, we will also be wiring the TPS wire ( gray NEO wire ) in at the same time.

Now locate pin 23 on orange ECM connector C2, pin 23 is a dark green / red wire. This wire should be cut, and the yellow NEO wire must be wired in leading TO the ECM.

The white wire is then wired into the opposite side, make sure to solder for best connection.

Now with the white wire connected to the vehicle’s MAP sensor, take your gray throttle position sensor wire ( gray ) and wire that inline with the white NEO wire. Make sure to wire the gray TPS signal closer inline to the actual MAP sensor found on the intake manifold.

Why wire the gray wire into the MAP sensor? because of the SRT-4’s 3-7 voltage range, the NEO’s normal operating range of 0-5 will cause issues when tuning fuel trims according to throttle position. Using the MAP sensor, we can tune for engine load, as opposed to guessing and hacking our way through different voltage ranges.

Here is an example of this wiring, please note the brown wire depicted is the actual gray TPS wire, and the light green / red wire is the NEO white wire. Sorry I had to extend the wires using another loom and didnt have colors available that were close to gray or white for that matter.

Now find your green RPM wire on the NEO harness, this should be wired into a tach adapter, msd part number 8913.

Connect to the gray Tach adapter wire for a consistent rpm reading based on the vehicle’s spark.

Now with your NEO fully wired up, make sure to pick up some loom and clean up your rat’s nest!!!

Now to setup your AFC NEO, go into the menu and select sensor type as “Pressure” as your SRT-4 operates on a MAP sensor.

Select the “in” value as 10, set the “out” value as 10 as well.

Go into the car setup, and change the cylinder value to 4 and set the “thr” setting to the arrow pointing up and right.

Now go into the “TH-POINT” Menu and set your throttle values to 20% for low settings and 80% for high throttle.

For example if your MAP sensor sees load under 20 percent, then it will use the low-settings on the AFC for adjustment. Anything higher than 80% will run off the high throttle map and anyhing inbetween the two maps the neo will interpolate between the 2.

Now run the NEO Harness inside the cabin, and you are all set!

Happy Boosting!

Case Studies – Installing Megan Rear Upper and Lower Arms in a S14

Today we are bolting on a set of Megan Rear Upper Control arms, and Megan Racing Lower Control arms in a 1996 240SX ( S14 ), part numbers are :

MR-RTCA-NS14Nissan 240SX Rear Lower Toe Arms

These arms allow you to change the static toe and toe change during suspension compression and load. An easy bolt-in upgrade, alignment is required after this install.

MR-RUCA-NS14 – Nissan 240SX Rear Upper Control Arms

These arms are meant to adjust rear camber to whatever specifications you desire. Replacing the stock rubber bushings with pillow ball ends provides a upgrade in stiffness and response.

Here is the car in question before the install :

Tools you will need for this install :

  • 14mm socket and open ended wrench
  • 17mm socket and open ended wrench
  • 19mm socket and open ended wrench
  • jack and jack stands
  • MR-RTCA-NS14 – Nissan 240SX Rear Lower Toe Arms
  • MR-RUCA-NS14 – Nissan 240SX Rear Upper Control Arms
First jack up the car and secure it safely using your jackstands, for those of you fortunate enough to work on a 2 post lift, just remove your wheels.
First use your 19mm socket and open ended wrench to undo the outmost bolt holding your rear upper control arm in place.

Next take off the rear bolt, and put the bolts safely away. You should now be able to remove your entire rear upper arm

Now, you’re ready to install your rear upper arm but not before lining your old arm up and adjusting the Megan arm to a similar length. You will need an alignment after this install regardless, so you might want to keep the jam nuts loose.

Next undo the outer most bolt in your rear lower toe arm, this bolt is located to the rear and left of your shock housing ( from the driver side )

Now, undo the inner bolt and this arm will come right off

Now install your new rear toe arm by reversing the process and you’re done!

Make sure your jam nuts are tight if you cannot align your vehicle right away, you don’t want them coming loose on you.

After your alignment, you should be ready to rock and roll!

Happy Drifting!

 

Case Studies – Installing TEIN Stech Springs in a Evolution X

A good friend of mine recently picked up a slightly used Evolution X from a dealer, after trading in his S2000. He’s been around DSM’s for the better part of his professional career, having worked at Road Race Engineering and the now defunct BOZZ.

So to say the least, he knows his way around the 4G63, and while it’s not the same motor we’ve grown to work on, love and hate, it’s still a Mitsubishi.

He’s not completely sure what route he will take in this car, but he knows that the current
rock-climbing-Jeep stance is not what he wants to drive around in.

To remedy the solution, he picks up a set of TEIN Stech Springs for his Evolution X.

What you will need for this install :

  • TEIN part number SKE18-AUB00
  • 17mm socket and open end wrench
  • 14mm socket and open end wrench
  • 12mm socket
  • flat head screwdriver
  • needle nose pliers
  • Spring compressor ( optional )
  • * I am not liable for any damage, direct or indirect due to any modifications made on your car, related or unrelated to this writeup.
First, get the car into the air and secure the car safely using your jack stands. Next pop open your hood and locate the 3 14mm nuts that secure the shocks into your car.
Now crack those 14mm nuts loose, but do not remove them. Next take off your wheels and let’s get the shocks disconnected from your front spindles.
First undo the 12mm that holds your brake lines to the back of your shock assembly and pull away on the brake line.
Now undo the 2 main bolts holding your front shock assembly to the spindle and then use your needle nose to pull the bracket holding the brake lines to the mounting tab on the back of your shock.
After removing the nuts, use your jack to secure your spindle so that it wont fall.
Take care not to use the brake shield as a jack point, with the spindle and brakes secured, undo the nuts and pull the bolts out of your shock.
Now revisit the 14mm bolts in the engine bay and remove them, but make sure to hold your shock assembly so that it doesn’t fall.

Look ma! no shocks!

With the shock now removed, you must now mark the orientation of the top hat and mounting hardware. You will be best served to remember the layout of the top hat and the orientation of the shock itself. If you have a spring compressor, now is the time to tighten it down on the front spring coil as to prevent harm when it uncoils.

If you don’t own a spring compressor, u can place the bottom of the shock against your rim and tire and gun the top nut off. If you are not comfortable doing this and don’t own a spring compressor, maybe this job isn’t for you.

Remove the top hat and set to the side, you should now be able to remove the rest of the bushings and mounts to get to your stock springs.

Now, with the top strut mount removed, locate your bump stop as it will require modification.

Using a marker, mark where you wish to remove the excess material in your bumpstop so that the Evo’s new stance will not create any problems.

Now reassemble your front shocks with your TEIN Stech lowering springs, make sure that you are aligning the marks on your top mount, and make sure the spring is seated flush against the shock body as shown here.

With the front shocks buttoned back up, you can now reinstall the entire assembly into the car. If you are working on a lift, you can now move on to the rears. Open your trunk and locate the push pins that hold the rear panel in place in the trunk.

Carefully push in the pin and pull out the tabs to allow you to remove the back panel.

You may elect to remove the factory trays that cover the spare tire and wheelwells. We elected to do this step, as the car was still pretty new and we didn’t want to damage anything. To remove these panels, simply push in the tabs as you did with the rear trunk panel.

Now, remove the long bolt that secures your rear shocks to the lower control arm and spindle.

Push the rear shock in and away from the lower assembly, and then go back up top and remove the 2 14mm nuts holding the shock in place. As you did with the front shocks, make sure you have secured the shock to prevent it from falling.

You’re almost there! Now undo the top bolt to the rear shocks, for those who skipped ahead or with some sort of attention disorder, use a spring compressor if you are not comfortable unloading the tension in the coil.

Seat the spring into the rear shock housing, making sure to line up the spring as your oe coil sat.

Don’t forget to modify the bumpstop!

Now tighten up the rear shock assembly and re-install into the back of your Evolution.

Now you are ready to rock and roll! Happy boosting!

Case Studies – Installing an HKS catback on a S13

Today we are installing an old-school HKS Hi-Power onto a 1992 Nissan 240SX SE.This is an older HKS unit with the old school dual exhaust tips, meant for NA applications.

Tools you will need for this install :

First raise the car up and locate your cat, depending on your vehicle and how old it is / exposure to rain / elements it may be rusted. If so use a can of Blast Away or similar product to get the nuts lubed up.

Next undo the 14mm nuts holding the cat to the exhaust midsection.

Now locate your exhaust hangers forward of the gas tank and to the left of the tank, held on by 2 14mm bolts.

Now you can drop your entire exhaust as one piece, make sure to take care when removing the catalytic converter bolts, as they tend to rust and may strip if not removed carefully.

Here is a comparison shot between the stock unit and the upgraded HKS catback.

Another shot of the midpipe and the comparison between both units

Now hang the rear muffler section onto the back of the S13, re-using the factory rubber hangers.

Next bolt up the midpipe to the cat, securing it by reusing the 14mm nuts you removed. Now line up the midpipe with the rear section, making sure to make a positive seal with the supplied HKS exhaust gasket.

Now tighten her up and you are done!

Enjoy and good luck!

Piggyback Heaven – Installing a SAFC in a MKIV Supra TT

I’ve died and gone to piggyback heaven in the early stages of 2012, as a good friend recently picked up a MINT 1997 Anniversary Edition Toyota Supra Turbo. I have always loved these cars and the insane amount of over-engineering that went into the legendary 2JZGTE.

Since this car is probably one of the ONLY stock Supras left on the face of planet Earth, my friend decides to go slow and just start at BPU for now. Basic Performance Upgrades for the Supra can routinely and reliably push the car into the mid 400 wheel horsepower range.

Here we install an older Apexi Super AFC piggyback fuel controller onto the Supra, just one part of the BPU process.

Things you will need
– S-AFC or AFC NEO – Depending on your preference. My buddy happens to be an ex-employee of Apexi, and he prefers the older AFCII. That’s what we’ll be installing in this writeup.
– 10mm socket
– Wire strippers
– soldering iron and solder
– flux if applicable

First disconnect the negative battery terminal, and open the passenger door to reveal the kickfloor and ECU panel.

Undo the three 10mm nuts and pull back on the ECU cover to reveal the ECU.

Next, take a look at the Supra ECU diagram, you will be splicing into most of the wires, and cutting just one.

Next locate the 40 pin plug, located closest to you if you are looking towards the front of the car. You are splicing the RED wire into pin 31 for switched power to the AFC unit, if you own the AFC NEO it will be the RED wire with WHITE stripe.

Next we locate the primary ECU plug that is part of the plastic shroud, again you want the plug closest to you or E10 for those who have a service manual. You will be splicing the green wire into the RPM signal pin 58

Here is a shot of the green wire spliced into pin 58.

Next we will ground the SAFC, make sure to locate your brown and black wires and FOLLOW the detailed instructions in your AFC manual. You must splice the black and brown wires apart on the ground pin, located on E11 pin 69.

Pin 69 must be spliced and soldered by placing the brown wire (ground 1) closest to the ECU, and the black wire (ground 2 ) an inch downstream of the ECU harness. Here is what you power and ground wires should look like installed.

Next keep the E11 plug in your hand and locate pin 43, which is the throttle position pin. Splice the gray wire into pin 43 for the throttle input to your AFC. Now, locate pin 66 and cut it leaving yourself plenty of room on either end of the wire.

Now take the yellow AFC wire and solder it into the wire you just cut, TOWARDS the ECU. After that take the white AFC wire and solder it into the wire, AWAY from the ECU

I used the Apexi supplied quick connectors on this Supra, as the plans are to move to a VPC or standalone later down the road. Soldering here is optional and not recommended should u have more plans for your 2JZ down the road.

Lastly, you can elect to wire the blue AFC wire to pin 48 on the E11 connector for narrowband 02 readings on the fly.

Now snap the ECU connectors back into the ECU and double check your wires for positive connection. Reconnect your battery cable and turn the ignition to the “on” position.

Once your AFC boots up, you can now make the proper adjustments before starting your Supra.

Select from the MAIN menu, go to SETTING, then to TH-POINT and set your LO value to 94, and then your HI value to 95% throttle.

Select from the MAIN menu, go to SENSOR TYPE and select HOT-WIRE with input values of 1 in and 1 out.

Select from the MAIN menu, go to CAR SELECT and select cylinder 6 with the throttle position in the upward position.

Now, use the NE-POINT menu in ETC to set your NE = 7000 RPM.

Since we are not installing injectors this time around, we will not be modifying the Supra’s low throttle fuel trims at this time.

Next up, installing the downpipe, exhaust and boost controller in the dash to 400 whp.

Case Studies – How to wrap your headers

Header wrap kicks ass….. when it’s already installed. Yep, nothing worse than wrapping headers or exhaust manifolds, especially when you are wrapping an elaborate one as we will be doing today.

One look at the Talon’s exhaust manifold and it’s quite clear to see that this task isn’t going to be an easy one. Wrapping headers isn’t exactly rocket science, but doing it right is important for aesthetic purposes.

What you will need for this job.

x1 Header wrap – we chose part number DEI-010101 – as this is for a 4 cylinder application. We also elected to use the 1 inch thick version as this wrap is easier for a manifold of this type and usually more pleasing to the eye.

x1 Safety Wire – You can purchase a Moroso can for around 20 dollars.

optional – Safety Wire wrench – you can also use a monkey wrench in a bind, but you wire twists will not look as nice.

Start by cutting off a section that you intend to wrap with, take care when handling the wrap as the fiberglass can come off easily and is a skin and eye irritant.

Dunk your wrap in a container filled with water, this will make the wrapping easier, as well as minimize the dust and fiberglass particles.

When taking your pre-cut strips out of the water, make sure to squeeze any excess water from the bundle. When applying the strips, make sure to pull the wrap taut and wick away any excess moisture when pulling the wrap around the piping.

2 Hours into the job.

Take care when securing the wrap with your safety wire, you want to make sure to get the wire as tight as possible for maximum viewing pleasure.

Almost there......

When wrapping a turbo manifold like this, it’s easier to plot out the path in which you will wrap the header. In this case, I had to wrap runner 4 and leave it hanging to allow for enough tuck room on runner 3.

All done

With the exhaust manifold wrapped, we re-install onto the Talon with a complete set of new washers, gaskets, and seals all the way around.

The Talon had a slight leak from runner #2, and we elected for a Remflex gasket to address our leaking issue.

We are using Remflex part number PN-54-001, and this gasket is every bit as badass as Remflex says it is.

After re-installing the entire turbo setup, the Talon is now ready to hit the dyno after a few gauges are installed.

Next up : Installing a full gauge set, pouring in some 116 and heading to dyno day!