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Case Studies : Clocking a Turbo

After my diagnosis on the CT26 turbocharger, I’ve determined that the best path would be to service and sell the turbo, rather than put it on the 2JZ as a starter kit.

To do this and get the maximum return however, I’ve decided to just sell as a replacement MKIII Supra turbo. Problem is, the CT26 I have now is not clocked correctly for a 7MGTE motor, and the compressor housing just isn’t the correct outlet or shape.

While this CT26 is being sold, this method can be used to rotate any turbo or service any center cartridge when the need arises. While the need may not arise, there may come a time when a new intercooler, different feed and return lines or other details may dictate a new turbo orientation.

First we must remove the old compressor housing, install the new one and clock the center cartridge so that the oil lines match up and charge piping mates to the turbo.

Using a needle nose and a small flathead, you must first loosen the tension in the circlip holding the compressor housing to the CHRA.

Now, undoing the compressor housing will give you a full view of the compressor wheel, make sure to not damage the outer ring when installing the replacement compressor housing.

Now last but not least, you must rotate and loosen the bolts / circlip holding the exhaust housing to the hot side of the turbo. Installing the new compressor housing and moving the internal wastegate mounts and arm over are the final steps.

Make sure to line up and adjust the wastegate actuator, so that there is no excess slack or tension in the rod before installing into your car.

Happy boosting!

Case Studies : Prepping Big Red for 5-9 Madness Part II – 6/21/2012

We’ve given Big Red a proper cleaning and in preparation of the next 5-9 Madness at Vic Hubbard, after upgrading the spark plug guides and wires / plugs / gaskets, we’ll be taking the next step today the day of the show.

Installing a new Edelbrock water neck, 160 thermostat and Edelbrock gaskets will help freshen things up for the show!

A shot of the old intake manifold, thermostat and thermostat housing.

Edelbrock part number 7201 will get our intake leaks taken care of and give us a chance to service the carburetor and intake plenum.

A shot with the carburetor off, as we replace all gaskets and service the carb.

Here’s a shot of the SBC all finished up and ready for the 5-9 Madness Show at Vic Hubbard / Pro Street Online.

Want to see more of the classic? Come on out to the 5-9 Madness Car Show!

Happy Cruising!

Case Studies : Prepping Big Red for 9-5 Madness

We’ve given Big Red a proper cleaning and in preparation of the next 9-5 Madness at Vic Hubbard, we’ve decided to finally get off our behinds and get some work done.

We’ll be adding a RPC valve cover kit and repair the current spark plug wire issues on the SBC.

Damage from headers and broken plastic guides

We’ll be using Taylor 98069 Spark plug wires to replace the spark plug wires on Big   Red.

Next we use RPC R6039 to help add a nice polished look to our engine bay as well as arrange the new spark plug wires in a manner that will help protect the wires from heat damage.

This accent piece works great for any SBC especially with the front 2 wires, as it gives just enough curve and cushion to push it ahead of the header. Heat and stress cracking can cause problems as shown below :

After a few minutes, we have the guides on and wires crimped down and run.

These things are off the chain!

Next up, we install an Edelbrock Endurashine intake manifold plenum, a new Holley Double Pumper carb – part number HLY-0-4778S and dressing up the engine bay further in preparation of Vic Hubbard’s next 9-5 Madness Car Show.

Happy Cruising!

Case Studies : Following the progress of Tomei’s Hyundai Genesis Turbo

My first experience with a Hyundai was when I was a teenager, and my father owned a 1984 white 4door Hyundai Excel. This thing was the epitome of the 80’s econo-crapbox, constructed with cheap plastics and budget minded parts that  translated into a reputation of being notoriously unreliable.

I can remember a time when the word Hyundai would make car enthusiasts turn up their noses and spit in disgust at the Korean Automaker that struggled to make a name for themselves in the US.

While my fathers Hyundai Excel ran for over 400,000 miles on the original motor, for the most part this reputation was well deserved.

Fast forward 30 years, and Hyundai has done a marvelous job reinventing themselves, and while the foray into the sport compact market has netted the Korean automaker less than desirable results in previous years, they seem to have hit a homer with the Hyundai Genesis.

While the luxury sedan has been well received by the automotive press, the coupe (shown here) is powered by the G4KC, a 4 cylinder turbocharged aluminum motor named the Theta.

What can I say? I’m a sucker for 4 cylinder turbocharged goodness!

With the revolution in rwd sport compacts such as the Genesis and the FR-S, RWD sport compact enthusiasts have never had it better!

I will be following the progress of one of my favorite tuners, Tomei and their Genesis Coupe Turbo to see just how it stacks up against some of the classic 4 cylinder turbocharged titans that have graced the US shores such as the SR20DET, EJ25, and my all time favorite the 4G63.

Stay tuned and happy boosting!

Jesse’s RB25 S13 – Installing Top Feed Injectors

When we last left the RB25 S13, the injector duty cycles kept us from bumping up the boost and making some real power. The solution? some 760cc top feed Precision Injectors to help our S13 crack the 450whp mark.

Parts you will need for this conversion

First we begin by opening the fuel cap and disconnecting the fuel feed lines, engine harness and fuel filter setup.

Next unbolt the 3 12 mm bolts to the rail and lift the entire rail along with side feed injectors, take care when doing this because you don’t want to lose your fuel rail isolators ( the plastic pieces that space out your rail from your head.

Jesse was using a Z32 fuel filter, which we will be ditching for a Aeroquip -6 1000 micron inline filter.

Someone light a match and throw it at John! QUICK!

Next, install your injectors into your aftermarket rail, take care when pushing the injectors in so to not damage your o-rings. Without any damage to our o-rings, we test fit the aftermarket rail onto our RB25.

The particular rail setup we are using is the JGY unit, and although the fitment is rather questionable, the low cost of this piece makes it manageable.

Ahh... so much nicer

If you own a JGY rail, now is NOT the time to tighten it down to the head unless you feel like removing the rail to plug your injectors in.

hrmm...

After installing the injectors into your rail, install your liquid filled fuel pressure gauge into the 90 degree 1/8th inch NPT fitting, and then screw the entire assembly into the regulator. Depending on your setup, you may need to install the fitting before the gauge.
Next, take the rubber fuel lines off of the hard lines located on the passenger side of the vehicle.

Take a pipe cutter and pick a spot on the hardline that has a fair amount of straight section to it.

Make sure to use caution as to not kink or bend the hard lines, this setup is meant to terminate at the firewall, so if you intend on running full stainless line back to the tank you’ll need more than 4 feet of the hose.

Next take your -6 AN to hard line compression fittings and slip the cone end over the hardline you just cut.

The S13 uses 1/4inch size hardlines, make sure the brass fitting slides snugly over the line and compress the two ends together to create your seal.

After both compression fittings are installed, it’s time to move onward to the injector wiring.

Most companies sell their injector setups complete with pigtails to convert from the old clips to the new ones. If not MSD sells them seperately for around 2 dollars apiece at most retail stores or websites.

Wiring of these injectors is straightforward, make sure to have the injector clip orientation consistent for all six new clips.

Use your -6 male to 3/8th pipe fittings now on either end of your rail,depending on where or how you want to run the lines, the other 4 swivels will comprise the rest of the fuel setup.

Once all the lines and hardware is installed, then tighten the rail brackets onto your head.

We had to use 2 of the brackets as JGY did not properly machine their rail to take 3 mounting brackets. Further we had to use the factory isolators on the opposite side of the bolt to make things tight and secure.

Once bolted down, turn the key to the on position to pressurize the lines so that you can check for leaks. Once we found no leaks we started the car and adjusted the fuel pressure accordingly. Make sure to double check for leaks after the car is started, as pressure will be significantly higher than it was with the key at the “ON” position.

With no leaks and the fuel pressure adjusted, we are now ready to tune the car. With time running late, i use Jesse’s hand held Power FC Commander to make some small adjustments to the part throttle map and the cold start map along with the idle map.

The Power Commander is quite useful if you are in a bind, or need to clear up a rough spot in your tune.

But with a viewable map grid of 9×9 cells, it makes tuning a vehicle such as this rather cumbersome.

Come get some... RB25 Power

Next we will hit the dyno with a full laptop and FC Edit to squeeze as much power out of the S13 as possible.

Stay tuned………..

Frozen Megan Track Coilovers

While I sort out the issue with the freight company dropkicking my 2JZ off the pallet, I decide to take care of my front end noises. The 240 pulls to the right on acceleration and makes an ugly clunking noise when turning the wheel left.

After tearing apart the front of the car, I discover that both my inner and outer tie rod ends are completely blown, my tension rods are shot and my Megan Track Coilovers are seized.

I absolutely despise anyone who installs bottom threaded coilovers without anti-seize, because it goes a long way in preventing this kind of seizing issue.

I take off the front coilovers and allow them to soak overnight in a mixture of Greddy Blue Synthetic 5w-30 motor oil and used pennzoil 10-40.

What's for dinner Ma?

As the entire bottom assembly must turn, this really is one of the only ways to unseize these kinds of coilovers without ruining the mounting perches or collars by clamping down on them.

Making a mess.. JH style

After spraying off the excess oil, I disassemble the coilovers so that I can knock the lower half of the coilovers free.

Air Tools FTW

After removing the adjustment screw and the allen head securing it to the rod assembly, I take off the pillowball upper mounts and pull up the dust boot to expose the shaft.

Remove the spring and lower locking perches and unwind the locking perch on the very bottom of the shock so that the lower assembly will freely turn.

Fly away Stanley.... be free

It takes just one swing of the hammer to knock loose the coilover mount, and now I can raise the car from it’s current “I-scrape-on-bubble-gum” setting.

After a call to my boy Nelson @ Megan Racing, he sends me a set of their new tension rods for the S14 chassis.

minty fresh!

Here’s a pic of my 15+ year old tension rod

That's not #winning

And finally a picture of the new Megan Tension Rods installed, for the record its 2 17mm nuts holding this part to the front lower control arm, one 17mm head bolt and 19mm nut on the K member

minty fresh!

With the new tension rods installed the car no longer has the horrible noises on deceleration and is much more predictable over bumps, eliminating the guesswork and diminshing the “bump steer” factor of the 240sx.

Next up : Installing new bushings and arms for the complete rear pumpkin assembly.