Posts

Project SC : 2JZGTE ECU Wiring into SC300 Guide

To prep the SC for the GTE swap, I’ve sourced a MT GTE ECU and a Aristo ( JDM 2JZGTE ) engine harness. For those doing this swap into a SC300, the wiring is a lot easier than the typical S-Chassis wiring in that many of the vehicle’s functions and wires are the same.

Given the similarities between the SC300 and the MKIV Supra, this is really no surprise, however you will need to lengthen and extend the third plug or body plug as well as rewire.

This body plug disconnects from the sc300 along the firewall, next to the ABS module and near the windshield.

Upon splicing open this harness, you will notice many similarities with your Aristo harness.  The large connector on this harness connects to the SC300 body plug and also the small plug that leads to the ECU.

For ease of wiring installation, we are eliminating the following wires (Traction Control D17,  Pressure sender ( Dummy Light ) D10, and Transmission Shift indicator D1)

Use the following pinout and match the corresponding colors accordingly.

courtesy of clublexus.com. not my pic

The Aristo harness and ecu plugs :

For a pin by pin how to, refer to this chart here :

Now with your engine harness properly wired, you may now remove your old SC300 harness and install your GTE ECU and plug it in. Next up, we start yanking weight in preparation of motor swap, as well as installing a new Cometic head gasket, ARP head studs and selecting our turbo setup.

Happy boosting!

Case Studies : Clocking a Turbo

After my diagnosis on the CT26 turbocharger, I’ve determined that the best path would be to service and sell the turbo, rather than put it on the 2JZ as a starter kit.

To do this and get the maximum return however, I’ve decided to just sell as a replacement MKIII Supra turbo. Problem is, the CT26 I have now is not clocked correctly for a 7MGTE motor, and the compressor housing just isn’t the correct outlet or shape.

While this CT26 is being sold, this method can be used to rotate any turbo or service any center cartridge when the need arises. While the need may not arise, there may come a time when a new intercooler, different feed and return lines or other details may dictate a new turbo orientation.

First we must remove the old compressor housing, install the new one and clock the center cartridge so that the oil lines match up and charge piping mates to the turbo.

Using a needle nose and a small flathead, you must first loosen the tension in the circlip holding the compressor housing to the CHRA.

Now, undoing the compressor housing will give you a full view of the compressor wheel, make sure to not damage the outer ring when installing the replacement compressor housing.

Now last but not least, you must rotate and loosen the bolts / circlip holding the exhaust housing to the hot side of the turbo. Installing the new compressor housing and moving the internal wastegate mounts and arm over are the final steps.

Make sure to line up and adjust the wastegate actuator, so that there is no excess slack or tension in the rod before installing into your car.

Happy boosting!

Project 240SX : Fortune favors the bold.

Well, it’s been a while since I’ve updated my blog here due to this unfortunate accident.

oops…

I crashed, I’ve gotten over it but my back hasn’t.

It was only a matter of time I suppose, given the abuse the S14 had been taking at the track. Fortunately, I’m relatively okay and I’m pretty fortunate to have escaped the entire episode without incident.

Moving forward, the car will be rebuilt, better, faster and lighter hopefully in time for next year.

Meanwhile, my focus for the 2JZGTE swap has taken an abrupt turn when I picked up Project SC a week ago. It took me some time to find a 5 speed manual, but I just didn’t want to deal with converting the auto to stick before my 2JZ swap.

Luck would have it, I found a cheap deal on a green 92 in SF. It didn’t take me long to swap over my wheels and rims, after a trip to Treds and some Butchie love.

Up next, the return of the 240SX, but not before some SC300 modding.

Note : The title is borrowed from jsworks, a fellow gearhead, enthusiast, inspiration and overall cool guy.

Check out his work after the jump!

JS Works Fortune Favors the Bold

Project 240SX : And the hits just keep on coming…… CT26 turbo failure

I’ve begun to tear into the 2jz and start cleaning, prepping and stripping for the swap into my s14. It’s been slow going for Project 240SX, but I’ve had more than enough on my plate lately.

The saga of the 2JZ just refuses to die down, because after inspecting the CT26 turbos, I’ve been setback yet again.

Using a turbo bench, it appears as though the CT26 will not build more boost than 4 psi.

This CT26 from a 7MGTE was a cheap starter turbo to get my swap in and running before cams and headswap and a bigger single.

At a the cheap price I had found it at ( thanks to Frank @ TTA ) it was a no brainer but now it won’t build any boost which makes it about as useful as a doorjam.

Troubleshooting a CT26 Turbo

Recommended tools : Air compressor, 14mm open wrench, 8mm socket

First we check the shaft play of the turbo, which seems to be fine. There are no excessive oil leaks or signs of blown seals on our CT26, and the CHRA seems to be in decent shape all things considered.

The turbo spins freely and nothing looks like it’s hitting one another, so we turn to the wastegate.

Using a air hose nozzle to gently blow into the internal wastegate inlet, the arm of the internal wastegate appears to be moving.

That means either the flapper is done or the arm may be bent out of shape, holding the flapper open.

Removing the 4 14mm nuts that hold the 02 housing to the exhaust housing. This will allow access to the internal wastegate flapper and troubleshooting the lack of turbo pressure.

Upon opening the unit back up we find that the internal passage that leads to the flapper have completely cracked open. Since the flapper can no longer close the opening sufficiently to build boost due to the stress and cracking, it means that I’ll need a new housing.

This brings me to a crossroads because if this turbo cost anymore than it already did ( nothing ) I had to decide whether or not the investment would be worth it in the CT26.

Next up : Looking at possible turbo replacements

Case Studies – Project Supra hits the Dyno!

When we last left our 1997 Anniversary Edition Supra, it was just getting used to calling to it’s new owner and had been modded for the first time in its life.

Because the car is so new, my friend is adamant about going slow and keeping it BPU for a while. He even goes so far as to utter the sentence I have heard about a zillion times from customers over the years.

“No, I’m more than happy with this power level, I don’t need to mod the car any further”

When people usually say this to me, I snort in derision and just sit back as the mod bug proceeds to take a huge bite of their wallet.

My friend has been a employee of Apexi for over 7 years, and even he cannot deny the temptress that is the 2JZ.

Within a few days of installing the old school Super AFC, he went out and purchased an upgraded turbo, manifold, Greddy 4 row intercooler, a full set of Greddy gauges, and 660cc RC injectors.

The turbo installed is a T4 62-1 with a 4 inch inlet .70 a/r compressor, with a stage V 1.01 A/R exhaust side.

For a rough idea of how much of an upgrade this small turbo is, take a look at this side by side comparison of a T4 62-1 and a CT26.

He’s elected to go with a SSAutochrome style Ebay log style manifold coupled with a 44mm Tial wastegate dumping back into a 3inch downpipe and full exhaust with a high flow cat.

With just a few mods and a turbo / manifold swap, we head down to our friends at DSR, check them out here : http://www.dynospotracing.com/

Using the DatScan datalogger, we tap into the Supra’s ECM to get a firm readout on the engine’s vitals. More importantly we determine the tip-in point for boost as we dial in the fuel trims accordingly.

We are aiming for a 12.5 AFR at the transition and a rock solid 11:1 at WOT until redline. The Supra is running 22 psi of boost through a full catback and 3inch Vibrant High Flow Catalytic Converter.

After just an hour, the car put down a SAE corrected power level of 521 with 433 ft lbs of torque.

The Supra put down a very healthy number with an excellent fuel curve, all for just a handful of mods. Next up for the car is a bigger turbo, more boost and Crower cams!

Congratulations Eric!

Piggyback Heaven – Installing a SAFC in a MKIV Supra TT

I’ve died and gone to piggyback heaven in the early stages of 2012, as a good friend recently picked up a MINT 1997 Anniversary Edition Toyota Supra Turbo. I have always loved these cars and the insane amount of over-engineering that went into the legendary 2JZGTE.

Since this car is probably one of the ONLY stock Supras left on the face of planet Earth, my friend decides to go slow and just start at BPU for now. Basic Performance Upgrades for the Supra can routinely and reliably push the car into the mid 400 wheel horsepower range.

Here we install an older Apexi Super AFC piggyback fuel controller onto the Supra, just one part of the BPU process.

Things you will need
– S-AFC or AFC NEO – Depending on your preference. My buddy happens to be an ex-employee of Apexi, and he prefers the older AFCII. That’s what we’ll be installing in this writeup.
– 10mm socket
– Wire strippers
– soldering iron and solder
– flux if applicable

First disconnect the negative battery terminal, and open the passenger door to reveal the kickfloor and ECU panel.

Undo the three 10mm nuts and pull back on the ECU cover to reveal the ECU.

Next, take a look at the Supra ECU diagram, you will be splicing into most of the wires, and cutting just one.

Next locate the 40 pin plug, located closest to you if you are looking towards the front of the car. You are splicing the RED wire into pin 31 for switched power to the AFC unit, if you own the AFC NEO it will be the RED wire with WHITE stripe.

Next we locate the primary ECU plug that is part of the plastic shroud, again you want the plug closest to you or E10 for those who have a service manual. You will be splicing the green wire into the RPM signal pin 58

Here is a shot of the green wire spliced into pin 58.

Next we will ground the SAFC, make sure to locate your brown and black wires and FOLLOW the detailed instructions in your AFC manual. You must splice the black and brown wires apart on the ground pin, located on E11 pin 69.

Pin 69 must be spliced and soldered by placing the brown wire (ground 1) closest to the ECU, and the black wire (ground 2 ) an inch downstream of the ECU harness. Here is what you power and ground wires should look like installed.

Next keep the E11 plug in your hand and locate pin 43, which is the throttle position pin. Splice the gray wire into pin 43 for the throttle input to your AFC. Now, locate pin 66 and cut it leaving yourself plenty of room on either end of the wire.

Now take the yellow AFC wire and solder it into the wire you just cut, TOWARDS the ECU. After that take the white AFC wire and solder it into the wire, AWAY from the ECU

I used the Apexi supplied quick connectors on this Supra, as the plans are to move to a VPC or standalone later down the road. Soldering here is optional and not recommended should u have more plans for your 2JZ down the road.

Lastly, you can elect to wire the blue AFC wire to pin 48 on the E11 connector for narrowband 02 readings on the fly.

Now snap the ECU connectors back into the ECU and double check your wires for positive connection. Reconnect your battery cable and turn the ignition to the “on” position.

Once your AFC boots up, you can now make the proper adjustments before starting your Supra.

Select from the MAIN menu, go to SETTING, then to TH-POINT and set your LO value to 94, and then your HI value to 95% throttle.

Select from the MAIN menu, go to SENSOR TYPE and select HOT-WIRE with input values of 1 in and 1 out.

Select from the MAIN menu, go to CAR SELECT and select cylinder 6 with the throttle position in the upward position.

Now, use the NE-POINT menu in ETC to set your NE = 7000 RPM.

Since we are not installing injectors this time around, we will not be modifying the Supra’s low throttle fuel trims at this time.

Next up, installing the downpipe, exhaust and boost controller in the dash to 400 whp.

Aligning at Treds

A good friend of mine just opened his doors at Treds Alignment in Hayward, which presented me with the perfect opportunity to hash out any lingering stance issues.

Jesse, Butch and Chris are as cool as they come, and provide top-notch support and service. Butch is probably one of the most experienced and knowledgeable alignment guys in the Bay Area.

The runway....

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After swapping / replacing all the arms and my rear subframe, Butch tells me the only thing left is my front passenger side lower control arm. I probably will not be opting for the replacement arms here, but instead going with stock arms and Energy Suspension bushings.

What do you mean the car doesnt drive straight???

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A shot of my rear arms, and now straight subframe.

It's really....... blue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dialing it in

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After Butch dials the car in, the difference is as drastic as night and day. The car no longer pulls to the right and feedback on turn-in as well as exit is much more consistent. I also take the time to upgrade my inner and outer tie rod ends, and as a result bumpsteer is significantly reduced.

Next up : 2JZ wiring and other nightmares.

 

OH NO0OEZ!!11

The freight company calls with some bad news, it appears as though my good fortune in finding a 2JZ may have run out. My motor looks to have fallen off the pallet during shipping and according to the warehouse worker “is pissing all over the floor”

What my motor looked like before being dropped and cracked open.... sniff

Time to file a claim and see where this takes me..

Murphy’s Law strikes again….