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Case Studies : Clocking a Turbo

After my diagnosis on the CT26 turbocharger, I’ve determined that the best path would be to service and sell the turbo, rather than put it on the 2JZ as a starter kit.

To do this and get the maximum return however, I’ve decided to just sell as a replacement MKIII Supra turbo. Problem is, the CT26 I have now is not clocked correctly for a 7MGTE motor, and the compressor housing just isn’t the correct outlet or shape.

While this CT26 is being sold, this method can be used to rotate any turbo or service any center cartridge when the need arises. While the need may not arise, there may come a time when a new intercooler, different feed and return lines or other details may dictate a new turbo orientation.

First we must remove the old compressor housing, install the new one and clock the center cartridge so that the oil lines match up and charge piping mates to the turbo.

Using a needle nose and a small flathead, you must first loosen the tension in the circlip holding the compressor housing to the CHRA.

Now, undoing the compressor housing will give you a full view of the compressor wheel, make sure to not damage the outer ring when installing the replacement compressor housing.

Now last but not least, you must rotate and loosen the bolts / circlip holding the exhaust housing to the hot side of the turbo. Installing the new compressor housing and moving the internal wastegate mounts and arm over are the final steps.

Make sure to line up and adjust the wastegate actuator, so that there is no excess slack or tension in the rod before installing into your car.

Happy boosting!