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Project Fit : Hondata Flash Pro and bolt ons

This 2008 Honda Fit Sport has recently been equipped with the recently released Hondata Flash Pro, and we hit the dyno to try and get a baseline before further mods.

Current mods on vehicle :

AEM CAI Intake
DC sport 4-1 ceramic header
Skunk2 60mm cat back exhaust
Denso IK-22 plugs and 91 octane pump gas

Equipped with basic I/H/E and nothing too fancy, we visit Dynospot Racing once more to use their Dynojet 448x. With no changes to the factory tune, the Fit puts down 87 whp and a very decent curve but overly rich at 12.1:1 air fuel ratio. At redline the car approaches a 11.7:1 ratio….. lol rich much?

After the basic changes to speed limiter and rev limiter, we advance the VTEC engagement point 500 rpm, and make adjustments to the lo and hi fuel tables.

Leaning out the midrange and top end of the car helps out quite a bit, and the Fit improves 14 hp and gains 8 ft lbs of torque. As this vehicle is primarily a road course and autocross vehicle, and straight line performance is not as important, we conservatively tune the car for serious duty and optimum safety.

The Hondata has allowed us to extract the horsepower that our mods were supposed to provide. The basic header, intake, and exhaust mods made the stock ecu compensate by running the car rich, and after tuning the car is much more responsive across the board.

The modest gains in power aren’t as evident as the increase in overall driveability and response. This FlashPro is an excellent choice for anyone looking to maximize their modifications or even take the next step by going forced induction.

Next up, a Honda Fit header comparison before our other Project Fit goes turbo!

Happy tuning!

Project SRT-4 : Back on the road and tuning with the AFC

Project SRT-4 has been on a long hiatus, and after popping the headgasket late in 2008, we’ve finally gotten back around to getting this monster back on the street. Since it’s been a few weeks since our last update, let’s run through a quick recap.

Staying with the stock bottom end, we’ve chosen to run a Cometic head gasket for the SRT-4 along with ARP head studs to keep the 2 halves together.

Head is assembled, cams and cam caps torqued and assembly lube generously applied. Next, we torque down the head, following the SRT-4 tightening sequence.

Now onto the real challenge, installing and fabricating the downpipe, chargepipe and turbo kit on the back of this motor. What you are looking at is a 50mm Tial wastegate, DNP Turbo manifold and the back of the motor.

Project SRT cracked 350 whp on my Dynojet448x using a slightly upgraded stock turbo and stock fuel. Since then, we’ve stepped up to a 62-1 Garrett T3/T4 turbocharger in hopes of chasing down 440 whp on 91 octane.

Unfortunately, that also means ditching the stock manifold, turbo and downpipe, and if you’ve ever seen the SRT-4 Engine bay, you know how much of a bitch this is going to be.

After quite a bit of cursing and yelling, we’ve mounted and installed the turbo, manifold and wastegate, but our problem is still the dumptube.

Here’s a shot of under the car, looking at the back of the motor between the firewall and subframe. If you see the 2 power steering lines going into the rack there, that is about the only space we have to route a dumptube.

Time to get lucky.

Using a Vibrant V-band flange, we weld a 1.75 inch J pipe and completely hack up the bend to get the radius as tight as humanly possible.

After a lot of cutting and hacking, we’ve got a pipe that allows us to bolt it to the wastegate egress, but the bend is not tight enough to clear the power steering lines or alternator properly. Further, the opening is not large enough for us to cut and reweld, and instead of removing parts again, we’ve opted to heat up the pipe and bend as need be.

Unfortunately, we forget that the dump tube is 304 stainless.

It look a whole lot of heating and bending, but we finally got the screamer pipe to bolt on and clear all the lines properly.

A look at the finished product, note the clearance on the power steering lines as well as the clearance to the charge pipe coming off the turbo.

Now with that out of the way, we go to tune the SRT-4, only to find that the AFC NEO has a blank screen and refuses to turn on. This is a fairly common issue for these piggybacks as people love to yank and pull on the wiring loom, pulling the daughter board out of the AFC PCM.

To fix this issue, simply remove the hex bolts on the back of the AFC NEO and gently pull apart.

After plugging the harnesses back into the daughterboard, we snap the NEO back together and reinstall the hex bolts.

Your NEO may or may not go into DEMO mode, a mode in which the screen flashes and is not responsive to any button inputs. To solve this issue, turn the car off and then turn it back on while holding the UP button on your NEO.

This will force it into a diagnostic mode, where you must select to “reset” the NEO to gain control of it again.

After all the little BS issues are taken care of, we dial in the boost at a very low 10 psi and hit the streets with a datalogger to get some rough tuning out of the way.

Next up?

Dyno time for the SRT-4 as we chase 400hp on 91 octane.

Happy boosting!

Piggyback Heaven – Installing a SAFC in a MKIV Supra TT

I’ve died and gone to piggyback heaven in the early stages of 2012, as a good friend recently picked up a MINT 1997 Anniversary Edition Toyota Supra Turbo. I have always loved these cars and the insane amount of over-engineering that went into the legendary 2JZGTE.

Since this car is probably one of the ONLY stock Supras left on the face of planet Earth, my friend decides to go slow and just start at BPU for now. Basic Performance Upgrades for the Supra can routinely and reliably push the car into the mid 400 wheel horsepower range.

Here we install an older Apexi Super AFC piggyback fuel controller onto the Supra, just one part of the BPU process.

Things you will need
– S-AFC or AFC NEO – Depending on your preference. My buddy happens to be an ex-employee of Apexi, and he prefers the older AFCII. That’s what we’ll be installing in this writeup.
– 10mm socket
– Wire strippers
– soldering iron and solder
– flux if applicable

First disconnect the negative battery terminal, and open the passenger door to reveal the kickfloor and ECU panel.

Undo the three 10mm nuts and pull back on the ECU cover to reveal the ECU.

Next, take a look at the Supra ECU diagram, you will be splicing into most of the wires, and cutting just one.

Next locate the 40 pin plug, located closest to you if you are looking towards the front of the car. You are splicing the RED wire into pin 31 for switched power to the AFC unit, if you own the AFC NEO it will be the RED wire with WHITE stripe.

Next we locate the primary ECU plug that is part of the plastic shroud, again you want the plug closest to you or E10 for those who have a service manual. You will be splicing the green wire into the RPM signal pin 58

Here is a shot of the green wire spliced into pin 58.

Next we will ground the SAFC, make sure to locate your brown and black wires and FOLLOW the detailed instructions in your AFC manual. You must splice the black and brown wires apart on the ground pin, located on E11 pin 69.

Pin 69 must be spliced and soldered by placing the brown wire (ground 1) closest to the ECU, and the black wire (ground 2 ) an inch downstream of the ECU harness. Here is what you power and ground wires should look like installed.

Next keep the E11 plug in your hand and locate pin 43, which is the throttle position pin. Splice the gray wire into pin 43 for the throttle input to your AFC. Now, locate pin 66 and cut it leaving yourself plenty of room on either end of the wire.

Now take the yellow AFC wire and solder it into the wire you just cut, TOWARDS the ECU. After that take the white AFC wire and solder it into the wire, AWAY from the ECU

I used the Apexi supplied quick connectors on this Supra, as the plans are to move to a VPC or standalone later down the road. Soldering here is optional and not recommended should u have more plans for your 2JZ down the road.

Lastly, you can elect to wire the blue AFC wire to pin 48 on the E11 connector for narrowband 02 readings on the fly.

Now snap the ECU connectors back into the ECU and double check your wires for positive connection. Reconnect your battery cable and turn the ignition to the “on” position.

Once your AFC boots up, you can now make the proper adjustments before starting your Supra.

Select from the MAIN menu, go to SETTING, then to TH-POINT and set your LO value to 94, and then your HI value to 95% throttle.

Select from the MAIN menu, go to SENSOR TYPE and select HOT-WIRE with input values of 1 in and 1 out.

Select from the MAIN menu, go to CAR SELECT and select cylinder 6 with the throttle position in the upward position.

Now, use the NE-POINT menu in ETC to set your NE = 7000 RPM.

Since we are not installing injectors this time around, we will not be modifying the Supra’s low throttle fuel trims at this time.

Next up, installing the downpipe, exhaust and boost controller in the dash to 400 whp.

Case Studies – Outside John’s comfort range

It isn’t everyday that I pause when someone asks me to tune their vehicle, but this particular Chevelle had me reconsidering.

Gary Avant’s Chevelle is a 383 powered, supercharged Chevelle using Edelbrock’s EFI Pro Flo XT Engine management unit.

Needless to say, a little bit out of my comfort range…..

Big, Bright and Shiny but not enough

Gary has had some problems with tuners in the Bay Area not being able to figure out the Edelbrock Pro Flo XT unit. The absolute best his motor had hit was 333, and with less than stellar torque numbers. Understandably, Gary was upset as his motor build cost him reportedly over $22,000 and 300hp wasn’t going to cut it.

After an hour or two messing around with the rather cludgy controller, I had the 383 humming at 422 hp / 441 ft lbs.

Sadly because of the Procharger’s linear power delivery, peak power could not be realized due to the limitations of the Pro Flo XT unit.

Gary’s unit had tuning increments from 1000, 1500, 2000, 2200 but after the 2200 rpm point, the Pro Flo XT inexplicably jumped to 5000 rpm.

In a rpm range as limited as this 383 provided, the tuning points lacked the proper resolution and from 3000 rpm until 5000, Gary’s A/F ratio plummeted to 10:1. Due to the rigid rpm tables in the Pro Flo XT, I had to send Gary on his way at just 422 rwhp.

He’s more than happy and has since sent the unit in for some customization, he’s very happy with the peak numbers and plans on having me retune while aiming for 500s.

Next up for Gary’s Chevelle, a bigger pulley, a better rpm table and 500 wheel horsepower or bust!